Domestic Violence Prevention, Death, and Law Enforcement

July 25, 2013
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New York City has stepped up Domestic Violence Enforcement, according to a recent article in the New York Times.

The basic premise behind most Domestic Violence laws is to protect victims, obviously, but also to stop minor problems from becoming big problems because pushing and shoving turns to more serious conduct over time.

While some parties and lawyers view Domestic Violence restraining orders as a tactic to gain an advantage at the beginning of a case, such orders may serve a cooling off period that prevents the parties from escalating to more serious behavior out of frustration. As a tactic, however, such orders frequently serve to cause more anger that interferes with the ability to settle cases.

Increasing police involvement to head off bigger problems, as a precaution, may prevent serious injuries and deaths. In the case described in the article, the female kept allowing the male to return, despite police visits - it appears she lied to them the next to the last time police officers went to investigate whether the boyfriend was coming back. The last time was to investigate the females stabbing by him, and her death, a week later.